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Old 09-23-2014, 10:36 PM
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Originally Posted by jhoehlein View Post
talk to your friends, family, neighbors, coworkers, anyone who will listen really about how awesome reefing is. Share your aquarium with pride - why should fancy cars and bikes get a pass as a sweet hobby, while we constantly feel the need to explain ourselves? I've never seen a 3-series light up like the fourth of july, but a well cared for reef glows. And it's alive! It grows! You can take little pieces and give them to someone else, and they'll grow too! And light up like a lite brite under blue lights! How awesome is that? But not too many people know, because the public perception of aquariums for the most part end at big public aquariums and that goldfish they won at the fair when they were 7.

Show the world there is more compassion, sustainability, and straight-up coolness to the hobby than the sickly floaters at the big chain pet stores they're familiar with. Show the world there is more to keeping an aquarium than cramming a betta in a mason jar. Show the world that the fish in your tank, their health, well-being, and longevity means just as much to you as any of their pets. Show the world that reef keepers aren't irreparably introverted mega-nerds, more comfortable with their fish than other people - no, we are normal people of all ages, incomes, backgrounds, and genders who share one of the most badass passions available.

And if you're not proud of our hobby, if you feel a little bit guilty, ask yourself why. You may be correct; the past two weeks have led to a lot of introspection across the entire industry, not just on how the threat of regulations got to this point, but how to bend ourselves to keep from getting legislated out of existence. I know i haven't felt good about what i'm doing in the past in regards to what i see in the stores and my own livestock purchasing. But if you really truly want to make an impact, you and everyone you know is going to have to do it with your wallet. Support aquaculture and mariculture. Get your live rock from sustainable locations, or use artificial. Know where your fish and coral are coming from, and which locations are more sustainable than others. Thoroughly research all livestock purchases so you have a solid grasp on what it takes to keep your new pet alive and healthy. Avoid notoriously difficult fish and coral. Pay a little extra for livestock you know came from a good sustainable source.

The hobby is threatened, but it is not under attack - instead it may end up as collateral damage in a fight over climate change. Any exceptions to regulations are going to depend on all of us demonstrating we care with our voices and our choices. Be proud of the fact that you are somehow through a miracle combination of modern technology, biological savvy, and communal knowledge able to keep a small coral reef thriving in your living room, and let the world know about it. For all the flak they (rightfully) catch the aquarium tv shows have exposed how fun keeping an aquarium can be to the general public. It's up to the rest of us to show them how awesome it is when reefing is done the right way. And if you don't feel great about what we do, it isn't a big secret about how to do it "the right way." donating to pijac is a great way to get our voices heard by the rule makers, but it's up to each and every one of us to do the same with the public at large, and to make the sort of purchasing decisions that will ensure your grandkids will have some coral to frag
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Old 09-24-2014, 11:33 AM
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Here is a really thorough, level-headed and factual account of what is going on:
http://www.advancedaquarist.com/2014/9/fish
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Old 09-24-2014, 02:03 PM
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The ocean is not going to be able to support it's self and the hobby forever. Its not if but when large bans on fish and coral are going to happen. Even if not at a world wide level it will happen at the local level. Look at Florida and Hawaii. If more people don't get into captive breeding and propagation now you will feel the effect of it in the future. If you are not growing, sharing and propagating now don't cry about bans in the future. I saw someone say that this site isn't about breeding. When you can't get a hold of some fish or coral in the future you would have wished there was more breeding going on.
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Old 09-24-2014, 11:07 PM
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Originally Posted by prattreef View Post
Here is a really thorough, level-headed and factual account of what is going on:
http://www.advancedaquarist.com/2014/9/fish
as for percula clownfish. Why are we even importing them? I know that tank bread perculas are becoming more common place. This one is easy... and they breed well and do well in captivity.
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Old 09-25-2014, 07:59 AM
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as for percula clownfish. Why are we even importing them? I know that tank bread perculas are becoming more common place. This one is easy... and they breed well and do well in captivity.
I totally understand what you are saying and agree with you. We might not be at that point yet but after generations of captive breeding you end up with a crappy gene pool and a bunch of deformed inbreds. That keeps some of the demand for WC fish. It is also cheaper and easier to catch them then to breed them.

Last edited by Cu455; 09-25-2014 at 08:12 AM..
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Old 10-22-2014, 08:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Sharkbait420 View Post
The ocean is not going to be able to support it's self and the hobby forever. Its not if but when large bans on fish and coral are going to happen. Even if not at a world wide level it will happen at the local level. Look at Florida and Hawaii. If more people don't get into captive breeding and propagation now you will feel the effect of it in the future. If you are not growing, sharing and propagating now don't cry about bans in the future. I saw someone say that this site isn't about breeding. When you can't get a hold of some fish or coral in the future you would have wished there was more breeding going on.
I am uncomfortable with this position as it does nothing for the wild reefs or the people that live near them.
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Old 10-23-2014, 11:07 PM
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This months Coral and Reef USA magazine has an article about captititive breeding, coral farming and the possibility of a ban.
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Old 10-24-2014, 08:57 AM
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bio man corals are not plants i have a 125 mixed reef tank and beside a couple of maricultured acros the rest of my corals came from frags that i grew to some big colonies i don't really see the need for us to rape our oceans for the sake of having a piece of it in our living rooms i do think there is a need for some reform before it gets too late they say that a coral like green nephthea is extinct in the wild but it grows great in our living rooms maybe its time to give back and bee more concious of what we buy and were we get it from
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Old 05-03-2015, 06:19 PM
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Hey, I'm Jack. I am new to this site and just getting back into reefing after a number of years. I find these types of problems are becoming a real threat to the hooby I am wanting back in to. I look at a club the size of MR and think about how many their are. With aquaculture growing the way it is, and the goodies being offered home grown. It seems to me if evreryone was to center on regrowing and working with what is available without getting our feet wet, we could start giving back and replanting in a big way. How cool would that be, to bring reefs back to life through our hobby.WOW, It would make admiring our tanks a whole new ball game. Just might even give us some clout to slow down, and maybe some day eliminate the scare of doing away with the hobby. I am new here and look foward to getting to know some of you folks. Have a good evening and maybe some good dreams of the future and less nightmares of what they are trying to do to us. Thanks
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Old 05-03-2015, 08:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Cu455 View Post
I totally understand what you are saying and agree with you. We might not be at that point yet but after generations of captive breeding you end up with a crappy gene pool and a bunch of deformed inbreds. That keeps some of the demand for WC fish. It is also cheaper and easier to catch them then to breed them.
Although I'm all for captive breeding you are correct about the crappy gene pool and deformities, just look at ORA clowns. Years ago ORA had some of the best captive breed clowns but now you couldn't pay me to own one of them or SA clowns. Your going to need to keep bringing in some wild caught to keep up with the demand of quality fish.
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