what book or author do you follow?

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Anonymous

Guest
who's philosophy in running a tank do you follow? or do you piece it all together and form your own way. i think i'm spending too mush time on the board. anyway i and others would like to know.

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if i knew, why am i reading the boards? now where did i put the bioballs, oh yea next to the ozonizer.

[This message has been edited by telltom (edited 28 January 2000).]
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I dont follow one particular person or philosophy save one...that of nature. I find myself in agreement with certain authors because they provide a solid argument based on scientific research and sound logic. Personally, I find Eric Borneman, Ron Shimek, Rob Toonen to be some of the most informative people that you may come in contact with. What is most important tho, is that you are able to think on your own. The information given by the names in the hobby should only be a starting point. It's you who should think and learn, not just ask continuous questions of people and take their word alone for it. Develop your own ideas based on the information that is out there. Dont just do something just because one author says it, ask why.

I think you get the point


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Dan
Minotaur15 on #reefs
http://www.tcnj.edu/~maughme2/
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Boards, boards and more boards. I don't even own a book. There is a lot of great info on the net. It is nice to read a book instead of a monitor though.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Nobody has "the answer"...which is a source of endless frustration for newbies.

One of the signs of a maturing reefkeeper is they stop looking for "the answer" and get on with figuring out what works -for them-. Very little about aquariums is really "known", in the sense of repeatable experimental evidence. It's mostly just opinion; some much more informed than others of course. :)

I think it really helps if you try and get the big picture and work back from there. For example, the ever-popular topic of "filtration" is really just a matter of imports and exports. Everything else, water changes, live rock, live sand, plenums, skimmers, carbon, ATS, algae sumps, you name it, they're all tools to that end. None of them will magically export everything you'd want.

So newbies, quit asking for the "right" skimmer or the "right" amount of live rock, or whatever. It doesn't work that way. Every tank's imports are different, so every tank's export needs are different. -You- have to figure out, given the characteristics of the various export tools, which ones are likely to work for -your- tank. Then -you- have to try them to see if they'll work -for you-. There is no other way. And this idea applies to all aspects of reefkeeping. Figure out what is happening/needs to happen, then look for tools/techniques to accomplish that.

No Reef God, book, or web board can do this for you.

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fwiw, imo, ime, ymmv, etc.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
LOL (Laughing Out Load)

With so many conflicting ideas it can get very confusing. This forum is one of the best sources of information I have found on the net.

I am just in the middle of reading "The Reef Aquarium, Volume One" by Charles Delbeek & Julian Sprung. Its sometimes a little technical but I think its a great book. I also have a book called "Marine Reef Aquarium Handbook" by Dr. Robert J Goldstein, Barron's Books. I also found it to be not bad, but not as good as the one I am reading now.

My suggestion is read as much as possible and frequent this forum. There are many people who are willing to help here, with no personal gain.

Reef On
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I'm not too impressed with the ideas/theories of some of the people that were proposed in previous posts, but certainly the Reef Aquarium, vols 1 and 2 are excellent books.

I would suggest Aquarium Frontiers as the best place to get up to date, semi-reviewed information.

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Randy Holmes-Farley
 
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