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Old 01-11-2019, 06:27 PM
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Just curious. Standing on the reef is part of conservation? Lol
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Old 01-11-2019, 09:02 PM
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That is one big hammerhead!! I dove in Cozumel years ago and it is cool to jump in and really not have to do anything but ride the current along the reef. I was a beautiful place to dive.
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Old 01-11-2019, 09:02 PM
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Wow that must be some adrenaline high , I went diving in St Thomas seen turtles and Ray's but no sharks like that
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Old 01-11-2019, 09:07 PM
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Very nice, how big was the tuna?
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Old 01-11-2019, 09:18 PM
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Originally Posted by duromega View Post
Very nice, how big was the tuna?
Thanks it was a very large yellow fin. maybe 250-300 lbs hard to tell underwater?
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Old 01-11-2019, 10:07 PM
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Originally Posted by willienelson View Post
Do you actually see anyone standing on corals? I see one picture, where you might think that is happening, but I assure you it is not. I assume you are referring to the diver holding onto a boulder with his hands while a large hammer swims by? There is a drop off and channel before the reef that I am above. Admittedly it is hard to see in that image. There are other images where we were wearing gloves. The environment is such that gloves are required.

The swell and current around this island are intense. The rocks and reefs are volcanic not calcium bicarbonate skeleton based. The rock is sharp and generally covered in barnacles particularly where most of the cleaning stations are. The diving is in fact dangerous even if you exclude the animals in your risk calculus. This is not your typical diving reef -- it is an extreme hub of marine life and oceanic energy (there is one coral lagoon on the island -- I must say it's amazing; I dove it at night gloveless).

Generally in the scuba diving community it is not considered acceptable to use gloves or generally to touch anything with your hands or any other part of your body. I have always done this and firmly believe everyone, who is diving on vacation, should practice this policy. My buoyancy control while diving, and more importantly, photographing while diving, are first rate. I have many hundreds of underwater time. I refer you to the belize images in this post and the other threads that I shared:

https://www.manhattanreefs.com/forum...-honduras.html


https://www.manhattanreefs.com/forum/photography/157342-pictures-vieques.html


In this particular instance there are some extenuating circumstances. I would have gladly engaged you in a discussion about cocos island, and the role of the Costa Rican citizens working in the fishery, and how the Costa Rican government is handling the issue. This is an incredibly important UNESCO world heritage site (https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/820)

I was part of a group working to substantiate and protect the Cocos Galapagos Swimway. More can be read about that here: https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-...-shark-highway Essentially there is an underwater mountain range connecting these two wonders. The costa rican fishermen have historically used this fishery. The particular group I was with acted both by, trying to effect political conservation law protecting the swimway, as well as documenting and substantiating scientific observations. I was diving with a group of 14 led by https://www.goldmanprize.org/recipient/randall-arauz/ and https://seaturtles.org/about-us/our-...odd-steiner-3/

I brought my camera down for maybe 5 of 25 dives. During every dive we were cataloging and counting species in 5 minute intervals. In addition we serviced acoustic receiver stations all around the island (physically brought old data up and new storage media down). Sure, there obviously should be some basic analysis considering the cost of the conservation activities versus the benefits. In conservationism and ecological organized efforts generally these costs are dwarfed the benefit. But there is always an observer effect, which is a well known physics concept.

I just wanted to share as I haven't been on the forms in two years what I've been up to that the community might enjoy due to the commonality that we almost all keep reef aquariums. I hope you have a good day sir.
There is no need to get offended by my sarcastic question.
You are talking about all of different things but the truth is as a diver and reef keeper you should know that it doesn’t matter what kind of rock is it it’s still considering part of the reef. You mentioned your self there was a lot of stuff growing on it so it’s considered a part of the reef is it? Most of the places band wearing any kind of gloves while diving for one reason and one reason only. So people won’t touch anything. I have been diving in number of different parts of the world and I see that about 80% of divers have no clue about how sensitive coral reefs are and have seen a lot of divers trying to take that perfect picture and distroing reef behind them with ther fins with out even knowing. Any way we both know there is a lot to talk about on this subject.
I didn’t mean to offend you in any way! Welcome back to MR and happy reefing!
BYW while you are in Mexico you should go a cross from Cozumel to playa del Carmen and go cavern diving. My favorite! I am going there next Saturday again and will be doing cave diving only.
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Old 01-11-2019, 10:20 PM
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Cozume this week & Bull sharks in Playa.

I Have a bunch drifting out in the open along the Santa Rosa Wall, but on gopro and not downloading properly.

And no one touched the reef in these photos... LOL.



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Old 01-11-2019, 10:56 PM
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Awesome shots !
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Old 01-11-2019, 11:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Chefjpaul View Post
Cozume this week & Bull sharks in Playa.

I Have a bunch drifting out in the open along the Santa Rosa Wall, but on gopro and not downloading properly.

And no one touched the reef in these photos... LOL.



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Amazing! Love that flounder!
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