Problem with RODI unit.

ValorG

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Valley Stream
So I'm having problems with my rodi unit not really working well at all. It's been ongoing and have went through 2 membranes already. My tap tds is about 130-150 and my rodi would make it go down to about 70 and this would eat up my di beads real quick. I read up that a may need a pump booster so I got one and decided to just start and get all new filters and new DI resin.

I'm making water and its coming out 0 tds and im like great problem fixed. Then I notice my di resin starting to change colors already... ughhhhh. So I test the water coming out of the membrane and its 110. keep in mind my tap is 130-150 and this is with a booster pump. Should I just chuck this thing and get an all new unit? It's really frustrating.
 

Adamc1303

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Which unit do you have? IMO They're basically all the same. A fracker that holds the canisters and then different filters in each canister. I wouldn't chuck it. However you may need to add parts to it to prolong the life of the DI resin and the membrane.
 

MIKE NY

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Are you using a 1-5 micron pre filter and carbon block before the membrane. That alone should knock the TDS down a lot. Are the membrane and the flow restrictor gph matched which if not can cause that problem as well.
 

theMeat

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What's up Yo. You should always call or text me with a problem like this. Right up my ally. In VS you shouldn't need a booster pump.
When coming out of membrane it should be 95% particle free. So if you're getting high #s coming out of a newish membrane, check tubing routing to make sure it's right. If that's good my first guess would be the membrane and the flow restrictor don't match, or the flow restrictor and/or cut off valve are shot.

This is Pete. Little late now, text you tomorrow see if you're straight
 
Last edited:

duke62

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He's getting 35 psi coming out of his water line. With that low of pressure he is killing his membrane. It's recommended at least 45 psi but 50 is ideal. Valor post up the membrane you just purchased
 

theMeat

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He's getting 35 psi coming out of his water line. With that low of pressure he is killing his membrane. It's recommended at least 45 psi but 50 is ideal. Valor post up the membrane you just purchased
Doesn't work like that. Low water pressure will cause low product water. Maybe slightly more than normal membrane damage, depending on rate of flow restrictor. Proof, he installed a booster, and still has problem. At 35 psi a booster is a good thing but in VS would guess there is a plumbing problem in the house, maybe at the tap to the rodi. Regardless, the booster pump, if installed and adjusted correctly, should take care of it. Atleast as far as product water output for the rodi.
 

theMeat

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Think it's worth mentioning too, for anyone in VS following along. Chlorine in vs tap water is at times higher than what is commonly found in swimming pools. That's right, not a typo. Chlorine is a membrane killer. Good idea to run one 5 micron filter in the first stage, carbon in the second and third stage, and replace often.
 

pecan2phat

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According to the below statement, either multiple stages of carbon filters or "catalytic" carbon filter:

Chloramine, which consists of a mixture of chlorine and ammonia, is added to the water of many cities as a substitute for free chlorine. It is often referred to in the plural, as ?chloramines,? because it can take on a number of forms according to the pH and mineral content of the water.

The whole reduction discussion for chloramines can become quite complex, but the main thing you need to know is that chloramine is removed from water with essentially the same strategies that are used to remove chlorine. This means that carbon filtration is the best removal method, and, contrary to urban legends, filter carbon does indeed remove chloramine. The problem is that it takes more carbon and more contact time to do the job. In practical terms this means that if your city disinfects your tap water with chloramines you'll need to get a larger and better carbon filter than you would need if chlorine alone were used.

For drinking water you can consider high quality carbon units like Multipure, or double and triple units that use lots of carbon. And, contrary to another widely promoted myth, reverse osmosis units do remove chloramine. In fact, they do it well, because any good RO unit contains a couple of carbon filters and the water gets an extra slow pass through the first one.

In choosing carbon for chloramine removal, a specially prepared carbon called ?catalytic? carbon is far superior to regular carbon.
 

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