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Old 08-13-2019, 05:20 PM
Saltwater since 1973
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tttony View Post
Very cool I have seen lion fish and butterfly fish when I use the scuba dive off of Brooklyn years ago
How many years ago were you seeing lion fish?
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Old 08-13-2019, 11:17 PM
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I've got a feeding plan set up for these sea horses. Turns out amphipods eat seaweed. I've been scraping the algae from my algae scrubber and dumping the biomass into a 5 gallon tank running off a sponge filter. There seems to be many amphipods breeding in the scrubber, so I decided to harvest them. The amphipods population seems to have been expanding and consuming algae faster than I could feed them. I caught 9 seahorses last weekend, only kept a couple of the smallest ones. I think I can keep them indefinitely, with food grown from the scrubber. In the photo I did bring a bag of ulva back from the ocean to help boost the amphipod population.

NOTE: after getting the look down to eat new life spectrum, I was not able to feed it often enough for it to maintain its weight. It feeding habits are like anthias. I will not try to collect those in the future, unless I can feed it soft food every few hours.
The burrfish, killifish, spearing, gobies and the blenny took to pellets right away.
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Old 08-14-2019, 09:07 AM
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Pretty cool. Can I ask where you are catching this stuff?
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Old 08-14-2019, 10:21 AM
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Wwould the mussels survive as a filter feeder in a reef tank? I have 1 or 2 very tiny ones on a rock that must have come as hitchhikers...
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Old 08-14-2019, 12:10 PM
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Location is oak beach or captree park. Needs to be on any where on the south shore, but protected by a barrier island. If you study the map there are plenty of locations from far rockaway to Shinnecock bay. Yes mussels will grow in a tank as long as there is plenty of tiny food in the water column. Plankton.
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Old 08-14-2019, 12:20 PM
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I am getting inquiries for meeting up, if you have a car, I don't mind help with the net. It takes 2 to pull it and there is a very limited time of a couple of minutes to sort the fish, before they die out. There is about a 3 hour window at low tide in the morning to do this all and it's constant work. I ride a motorcycle, so I can't give rides. Next low tide in the weekend should be at the end of the month.
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Old 08-14-2019, 03:21 PM
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So basically you park in that lot, and do you cross ocean parkway to other side, or do you throw the net on same side as the fishing piers? Do you bring a bucket with a battery power air pump? I am there all the time, never thought to look for tropic fish. Very cool.
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Old 08-14-2019, 06:18 PM
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The "eel" is a rock gunnel fish.
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Old 08-14-2019, 10:45 PM
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4 fish, I stay on the south side where the beach is. I would imagine they are also on the north side, since I do sample the north side under bridges. The south side is easy walking of course. The best spot is sore thumb, but that's a hike. I would also imagine the north side of Robert Moses is also good, though again it's a hike from the parking lot. If you have a boat, the ocean is your oyster. Yes bucket, air pump and frequent water changes. Then ice pack and cooler for the ride home. If the water gets too warm the O2 runs out. Shinocock bay should also be good. But that's what divers tell me.
CRABFly, thanks! I've been searching for an eel with no luck, it's a blenny.
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Old 08-15-2019, 07:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tttony View Post
Very cool I have seen lion fish and butterfly fish when I use the scuba dive off of Brooklyn years ago
https://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/08/nyregion/08fish.html
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