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Old 12-29-2011, 12:30 AM
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Lobophyllia not eating

Hi, came out of lurking to ask a question. I got a Lobophyllia colony recently (pictured below) that I'm trying to feed, but I get no real feeding response like I do with my other LPS despite what I do. I had a platygyra in my previous tank that I never got a feeding response out of either that eventually wasted away, so I'd like to avoid that with this coral.

So far, the ways I've tried are waving the food (I've used mysis, krill, frozen brine shrimp and Reef Chili) over the coral to see if tentacles come out and shutting off the pump and letting the different foods fall onto the coral. MAYBE I got 1 or 2 mouths to eat a brine shrimp but that's about it.

It seems pretty healthy otherwise, but then again, it's only been like a few weeks.

Any other suggestions or help is greatly appreciated, thanks!
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Old 12-29-2011, 12:24 PM
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I have some corals that don't put out tentacles but yet the food seems to get ingested. Make sure it is very finely chopped and leave it in each center and leave the pumps off for 20-30 minutes. If it needs to eat it will.
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Old 12-29-2011, 12:34 PM
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It's very common for a coral, that hasn't been fed regularly, for the tentacles not to come out, or if they do, just very short ones. You want to just keep feeding, but not over feeding it, and over time the tentacles will come out further and further.

The best time to feed it would be at night, as that is the time the tentacles will most likely be out.
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Old 12-29-2011, 09:06 PM
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Is there a particular food size (like mysis size, brine shrimp size, or rotifer size) that lobos tend to favor more?

I will try feeding it at night then.
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Old 04-17-2012, 01:46 AM
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Try offering liquid food such as zooplankton or marine snow, cyclopeze and/or arctipods to try to entice it to expand its tentacles.
Having said this, however, it seems like a very healthy brain coral and really doesn't need to be target fed to thrive in your tank since this species of coral is photosynthetic and will receive nutrients from its host zooxanthellae residing in the corals tissue!
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Old 04-17-2012, 02:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marrone View Post
It's very common for a coral, that hasn't been fed regularly, for the tentacles not to come out, or if they do, just very short ones. You want to just keep feeding, but not over feeding it, and over time the tentacles will come out further and further.

The best time to feed it would be at night, as that is the time the tentacles will most likely be out.
+1 def try at night and also try liquid type foods like planktons etc
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Old 04-25-2012, 09:49 PM
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Try feeding when the tank lights are off.
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Old 04-25-2012, 10:43 PM
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My lobo goes nuts for oyster feast. I add it right when the main lights go off and the blues stay on for 30 more minutes. It shows a strong feeding response with great extension on the tentacles.
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Old 04-26-2012, 01:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coralreefer1 View Post
Try offering liquid food such as zooplankton or marine snow, cyclopeze and/or arctipods to try to entice it to expand its tentacles.
Having said this, however, it seems like a very healthy brain coral and really doesn't need to be target fed to thrive in your tank since this species of coral is photosynthetic and will receive nutrients from its host zooxanthellae residing in the corals tissue!
Has anyone here ever had a bad reaction from target feeding marine snow. One member told me that they tried feeding an LPS by target feeding it marine snow and it pretty much disintegrated and came off the skeleton for a few weeks before it began healing.

I agree with everyone else that said that you have a better chance of feeding them at night. Some corals won't put out there tentacles because they are exposing themselves to threats so it's usually at night that they feel safe enough to put their tentacles out to eat. Marine snow, mysis or whatever u want to use is fine.

Did you dip it before putting it in your system?
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