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Old 11-22-2011, 12:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Jpaul View Post
The mouth is always open on mine, like it's gasping for air. Tentacles don't come out with pumps on or off.
Put some pellets on it, see if it eats them
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Old 11-22-2011, 02:36 AM
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Unfortunately, I think this is the fate of nearly every one of them in captivity. I had the same lack of success despite success with other corals and no obvious problems (slow recession) several years ago with the one and only one I've ever personally owned (before the gorgeous but ridiculously expensive "rare" ones were everywhere). Every other advanced hobbyist I've talked to about this that has tried them says the same. Of the untold thousands that are coming into the country, I have seen not more than a tiny handful that were alive after a year or more in captivity.

The most likely explanation for our lack of success, especially given the pattern of decline, is that we are simply not giving them anywhere near enough of the right kind of food and they are starving, but we have yet to figure out what the right kind of food is. Larger particles like those that most corals will take and thrive on don't seem to do the trick. Perhaps they need a more continuous rain of small particulate material???

Whatever the answer, we haven't come close to figuring it out yet. These guys are, IMHO, the next Goniopora (especially G. stokesii): beautiful corals that most people buy at some point, that survive for awhile, but that ultimately decline due to starvation in almost every case.

I really wish I could give you some useful advice, but the only cases of success I've seen are inexplicable flukes with no obvious reason for the apparent success, whereas in the vast majority of cases the corals decline further and further until they die. I am very sorry I can't offer advice to prevent that

cj
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Old 11-22-2011, 03:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Chris Jury View Post
Unfortunately, I think this is the fate of nearly every one of them in captivity. I had the same lack of success despite success with other corals and no obvious problems (slow recession) several years ago with the one and only one I've ever personally owned (before the gorgeous but ridiculously expensive "rare" ones were everywhere). Every other advanced hobbyist I've talked to about this that has tried them says the same. Of the untold thousands that are coming into the country, I have seen not more than a tiny handful that were alive after a year or more in captivity.

The most likely explanation for our lack of success, especially given the pattern of decline, is that we are simply not giving them anywhere near enough of the right kind of food and they are starving, but we have yet to figure out what the right kind of food is. Larger particles like those that most corals will take and thrive on don't seem to do the trick. Perhaps they need a more continuous rain of small particulate material???

Whatever the answer, we haven't come close to figuring it out yet. These guys are, IMHO, the next Goniopora (especially G. stokesii): beautiful corals that most people buy at some point, that survive for awhile, but that ultimately decline due to starvation in almost every case.

I really wish I could give you some useful advice, but the only cases of success I've seen are inexplicable flukes with no obvious reason for the apparent success, whereas in the vast majority of cases the corals decline further and further until they die. I am very sorry I can't offer advice to prevent that

cj
+1...its a coral that shouldnt be kept in a aquarium.yes they are beautiful but i havent heard of many success stories with scolys
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Old 11-22-2011, 07:35 PM
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Weird, out of all the corals in my dt, they grow the most and look the best..
They are placed very low and very low flow .... A lil less than a yr, I'll keep an eye on them
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Old 11-23-2011, 06:38 AM
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Wow, I guess I'm not the only one. I read that they were hardy and easy to keep, oh well another expensive lesson. The scolly is pulled tight over it's skeleton and the mouth is always open, I put pellets in it's mouth but it's doing no good.
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Old 11-24-2011, 07:31 PM
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Hmm well just a heads up... Was this a flat scoly? Or a designer looking one?
I did have a flat scoly that just did not survive,, my two designer ones are super colorful, they grow, eat, and easy....
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Old 11-28-2011, 03:33 PM
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I know that my two scoly don't like direct light and not much flow. In order for their feeding tentacles to come out I must have the lights out. Even my moonlights must be off. I feed meat chunks of silversides and pe mysis.
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Old 12-05-2011, 10:29 PM
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Just an update, scollys are coming back, the green one is starting to puff up again and the one that was receding is starting to grow back and it's feeder tentacles are coming out.
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Old 12-06-2011, 12:36 AM
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Just an update, scollys are coming back, the green one is starting to puff up again and the one that was receding is starting to grow back and it's feeder tentacles are coming out.
That's great news! I really hope they turn the corner and do well for you. As I said above, I have seen a very few that seemed to do well inexplicably. Most of them end up slowly going down hill regardless of the expertise of their caretaker, and regardless of the seeming overall health of the tank. I do hope that yours beat the odds

cj
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Old 12-06-2011, 08:24 PM
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Do you have any invertabrates in your aquarium?
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