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Old 05-02-2016, 09:53 PM
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https://www.reefs.com/2015/01/20/pot...d-look-part-3/
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Old 05-02-2016, 11:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justincredabel View Post
I personally prefer to maintain levels in the mid 500's to the 600's which I believe maintains a similar ratio of NPK as seen in the wild, since most reef tanks have higher levels of Nitrogen and Phosphorous than wild reefs.

but in the article you state >>> "Overdosing potassium can be lethal to the coral".

So, I'm little bit confused...? Is overdosing beneficial or is it detrimental? I was hoping to hear about your experience with dosing higher levels of POT. Do you have pictures of your reef before and after dosing high levels? Also, is there known direct correlation between Nitrogen, phosphorous and Potassium? if yes how so?

I would definitely try raising POT levels beyond 420 over time to see if there is benefit in my reef. However I have a final question. How does Potassium play out in a carbon dosed system? since carbon dosing reduces nitrates and po4 would raising POT levels be detrimental or beneficial?

Thanks in advance!
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Old 05-02-2016, 11:25 PM
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and a final question,lol.

Could you provide sources where to get pure potassium chloride and what brnds you recommend?
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Old 05-03-2016, 09:08 AM
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i feel like the article said somewhat skeptical about keeping it at around 600 to 800, at what point do you oversaturate the system is it 900 -1000 0r in some instances 500 not very clear about it and to be honest it seems that there are no true and tried methods of dosing to achieve the proper measurements and having to send your water to a lab seems a bit laborious hopefully there will be some kind of test kit made in the near future to help. even having a company that will sell it as a supplement is hard to find i think i will stick to my regular water changes until someone makes it a little easier to handle i would hate to loose my spss to a potassium spike good knows we all have had all kind of diff spikes to upset our tanks at one point or another why add one more.
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Old 05-03-2016, 04:42 PM
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In regards overdose, it a relative term in this instance. If you are going by the guidelines of 400 ppm anything over that is an overdose technically. But even if you are shooting for 400ppm and you are at 200ppm, dosing all at once can be stressful even though you bringing the level to normal. Acute stress and morbidity is usually the result seen from too quick of a rise in concentration. Long term dosing, that slowly go above most beneficial concentration of potassium for the system is usually a partial bleaching. For me I would watch my pink birds best. It was the first to respond yo positive effects and long term over concentration. Pinks begin coloring up to ideal color within days, to a peak pink brightness. If I go a little overboard the pink begins to lighten, and the background brown fades bit. Coral will be bleachy sometimes with low potassium, but you see a difference in the paleness. The pink will have turned a corner, and is still brighter than low potassium, but pigment formation becomes less efficient, thus the lightening of pink, then also zooxanthellae population become reduced a bit. Backing off of dosing, the coral will recover within days.

The highest beneficial concentration I've seen is 1200ppm in my systems, but most systems for me seem to do best around the mid 600s. Again there seems to be many variables at play in terms of various ion and nutrient concentrations that affect the potassiums impact on the organisms in the system.
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Old 05-03-2016, 05:05 PM
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I wish I had more concrete absolute definitive rules regarding potassium I could share, but overtime, in various reef system, with various water sources (natural, vs brand a ASW, vs brand ASW), supplement regimes and such.
I recommend any change in addtive regime should be done one at a time, especially if it is a hard to test, and variably interactive element or compound such we see quite readily with iron and potassium.
We have some pretty good safe rules for alkalinity and calcium, which are easy to test, and concentration effects, and reliable effects noted. We know a lot about the interplay between alk and calcium concentrations, and their direct effects on each others concentration, as well as Magnesium's effect on changing the all/ca solubility sea saw, allowing more calcium to remain in solution at a given alk unity. There are many of these interactions of all the various ions in saltwater, all affecting each other to varying degrees.
I really do think testing is great, and I can't disparage the "don't add what you can't test for" rule. But... We won't be seeing a quick and accurate iron test any time soon, it is known that iron reacts very quickly in seawater, within half an hour 99% of iron added may no longer be in solution, having reacted with other ions in the system and uptake from animals. Natural levels are usually in the parts per billion. Minutes after a dose (ideally I drop dose over the course of the day) concentrations could be 100s of times higher than natural sea water. If we did that with other ions it would be catastrophe. I know if I don't dose iron my coral don't look as good, and critically from a farming perspective, growth is not as efficient.
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Old 05-03-2016, 05:25 PM
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I wish I had more concrete absolute definitive rules regarding potassium I could share, but overtime, in various reef system, with various water sources (natural, vs brand a ASW, vs brand ASW), supplement regimes and such.
I recommend any change in addtive regime should be done one at a time, especially if it is a hard to test, and variably interactive element or compound such we see quite readily with iron and potassium.
We have some pretty good safe rules for alkalinity and calcium, which are easy to test, and concentration effects, and reliable effects noted. We know a lot about the interplay between alk and calcium concentrations, and their direct effects on each others concentration, as well as Magnesium's effect on changing the all/ca solubility sea saw, allowing more calcium to remain in solution at a given alk unity. There are many of these interactions of all the various ions in saltwater, all affecting each other to varying degrees.
I really do think testing is great, and I can't disparage the "don't add what you can't test for" rule. But... We won't be seeing a quick and accurate iron test any time soon, it is known that iron reacts very quickly in seawater, within half an hour 99% of iron added may no longer be in solution, having reacted with other ions in the system and uptake from animals. Natural levels are usually in the parts per billion. Minutes after a dose (ideally I drop dose over the course of the day) concentrations could be 100s of times higher than natural sea water. If we did that with other ions it would be catastrophe. I know if I don't dose iron my coral don't look as good, and critically from a farming perspective, growth is not as efficient.
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Old 05-03-2016, 09:49 PM
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Salpet, it's refreshing to see so many careful reefers here. It sure would be great to have definite recommend concentration of potassium, but this one of the elements that interact in complex ways with other ions. I do feel certain eventually we will have more precise measurements for potassium and many other important elements, as well as there interactions with which ions and at what concentration.

If your tank is amazing and you are happy with everything, then no need to fix something that isn't broken. I can tell you for sure there are some systems that would greatly benefit higher levels of potassium. Anytime I do a new additive I start very slow, and doses smaller than recommend starting dose, safety first. You will have time notice any changes or impacts.

So I can honestly say I can't recommend a set dose per gallon of ppm for each system due to the variability in everyone's tanks. In some degree we see this peroxide dosing. We have a narrower range of predictably safe concentrations within a certain range. But peroxide is highly reactive to various elements and organic molecules. The rule for dosing includes a range, but you should always observe and adjust. Take it slow, be safe.
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Old 05-03-2016, 11:01 PM
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JUstinCredible

I would like to try and give this a go. I am currently using a liquid POT by brightwell aquatics. is there a dry POT that I can mix at concentration and use a dosing pump to elevate slowly over time? can you please list the brand you use that you mention in your article? and again, I carbon dose and was wondering if your tank that you are mentioning is one of low nutrient utilizing carbon dosing?

I would be happy to report my findings over time here in.
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Old 05-04-2016, 01:13 AM
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Just a heads up . Salifert Potassium test kit is to be released to USA today. So retailers in a few days should have them. Finally
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